5 October 2018

What does Fair Fashion Mean? We asked Danaja Vegelj, Head of Designer Scouting at SHOWROOM

What does Fair Fashion Mean? We asked Danaja Vegelj, Head of Designer Scouting at SHOWROOM

Credit: Mikolaj Ostrowski

Danaja Vegelj is Showroom’s Head of Designer Scouting. Together with the team she has selected young designer brands for our Berlin pop-up store in Galeries Lafayette that meet ecological criterias and are talented at the same time. We asked the design-expert about the definition of fair fashion and more.

Fair fashion is a big term. How do you define it? 

“Sustainability” is near the top of the list of words being thrown around in today’s popular culture. Some say that designers need to use organic cotton or recycled wool. Some say that brands need to be officially certified. Personally, I see this topic as a human one. To me, sustainability means treating everyone involved in the production process fairly – starting with pattern-cutting, material sourcing, dying and shipping. In other words sustainability is about fairness. Fairness to the people who produce. Fairness towards the animals. Fairness towards the environment.
Ade Velkon at Galeries Lafayette. Credit: Mikolaj Ostrowski
Ade Velkon at Galeries Lafayette. Credit: Mikolaj Ostrowski

In our Berlin Pop-up Store in Galeries Lafayette we are currently featuring a beautiful selection of fair fashion designers. How did you choose the candidates?

We chose brands that not only work and exist fairly, but also have a story to tell. Rudolf Vienna, for example, is made within 150 kilometres of Vienna and collaborates with real people who touch the products with their own hands. Sanikai, on the other hand, is a certified Swiss brand that uses recycled and eco-friendly materials, and is extremely strict about the production process. Every brand we’ve chosen is different, yet they all have one thing in common – they have substance, a heart.

Rudolf Vienna at Galeries Lafayette. Credit: Mikolaj Ostrowski

What are your three highlight pieces from our fair fashion selection?

Firstly, a colorful oversized knit, made by a young Polish designer called Berenika Czarnota that will probably replace my own jacket in the weeks to come. Second, a long cotton dress in check pattern by Berlin-based duo Ade Velkon, that reminds me of the early 90’s and adds a touch of grunge to an overly sleek outfit. Finally, a pair of ergonomically-designed underwear by Viennese Studio Miyagi – sexy and very understated.

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